Follow us on: Facebook Twitter RSS feed

Displaying items by tag: Death Subscribe to this RSS feed

Tips

Posted on:
05 December 2016

Social media has changed how we interact with our friends and family members – and even how we mourn the loss of a loved one. A blog reader recently asked if I could share a post about how to control what happens to your social media accounts after death. Here it is.

Dealing with the death of a loved one is never easy. The funeral director can assist with registering the death and obtaining Death Certificates but there are many other things to take care of during this difficult time. For instance, cancelling identification cards to make sure that nobody can open credit in the deceased’s name. In this blog, we will share some key logistical items (with links to checklists) that should be addressed following the death of a loved one.

Cemetery & Funeral Services

Posted on:
11 January 2015

Have you shared your end-of-life wishes with those you love? While these can be difficult conversations to have, it’s important to have them on your own terms – this will help ensure your final wishes are fulfilled and not left up to emotions. To read tips about how to have “the talk” with your loved ones about their end of life wishes, please click here.

Cemetery & Funeral Services

Posted on:
22 January 2013

Funerals and anything related to this topic are a difficult thing to talk about, and there are many choices to be made when it comes to planning. It seems like more and more British Columbians are considering green burials when it comes to after-death disposition, so we thought we would share a little information about this option. 

Cemetery & Funeral Services

Posted on:
24 October 2012

Navigating through the death of a friend or family member can be incredibly challenging, from managing grief to trying to fulfill last wishes and working through the legal requirements and documentation. The Cremation, Interment and Funeral Services Act is the law that regulates funeral services, cemeteries and crematoria. This law also outlines who has final say around what happens to a loved one’s remains once they have passed on.  

Each family has ideas about whether or not to take children to a funeral.  It is also important to find out what the child feels about attending.  One thing is for sure.  Because there is so much mystery and secrecy about death and its rituals the child’s imagination may have already created some things that are scarier than reality. So, although it’s hard to do, find a quiet, private place and start off by asking the child what they think is happening and will happen.

My grandfather always loved his special spot by the lake.  He had many happy memories of fishing and spending time with his family there.  In fact, one of his last wishes was that his ashes be scattered on the shore of the lake.  But when the time came for us to scatter the ashes we all had the same question -this is a public place, are we allowed to scatter ashes here?