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Consumer Contracts (35)

Consumer Protection BC monitors the marketplace to make sure that businesses are communicating clearly and honestly to consumers about their products or services.

Not only do we license specific sectors, but we also regulate certain businesses and occupations and their practices. The law in BC identifies consumer rights when it comes to four specific types of consumer contracts.  In this blog we will talk about different areas of each of these contract types so that you can understand your rights and responsibilities and make more informed decisions.

If you want to find out more about these consumer contracts right now, please visit the consumer contracts section of our website.

Consumer Contracts

Posted on:
01 August 2017
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A lot of people see the benefits of online shopping. It’s quick, easy, and you don’t even need to leave your home to do it. However, the ease of shopping at home can come with its own set of problems. Have you ever ordered something online and as the delivery date approaches you find yourself constantly checking the front door, impatiently awaiting your package? Soon a couple weeks pass and the panic starts to set in. You start to wonder if there’s been a mistake. You’ve already paid for it, so what do you do now?

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Consumer Contracts

Posted on:
04 July 2017
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As soon as summer hits, Consumer Protection BC tends to receive an increased number of calls from consumers who have been approached about buying a vacuum cleaner. These types of sales usually occur either on the phone or through a door-to-door salesperson. There are many legitimate companies who make a living this way, but there are a few things to consider if you are approached by someone selling a vacuum.

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Consumer Contracts

Posted on:
27 June 2017
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It was time to get his chimney fixed so Eddy hired a masonry company to do the repairs. After quite a delay in getting any work done, the masonry company tried to convince Eddy he had a mould problem in his house and they could help.

Eddy had a background in the trades and knew there was no mould problem. This was a red flag for him so he decided to cancel the contract and get his deposit back. Something just didn’t feel right. When the business owner stated all deposits were non-refundable, Eddy got nervous.

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Consumer Contracts

Posted on:
20 June 2017
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Jake landed a new job in Calgary and had three weeks to pack up his life in Winnipeg. He started looking for a moving company, “being a millennial, the first place I looked was online,” says Jake. He hired the company and arranged for his belongings to be delivered to Calgary.

The delivery date arrived and his belongings were nowhere to be seen. Something didn’t feel right.

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Consumer Contracts

Posted on:
13 June 2017
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Chelsea had paid for a lifetime membership with a yoga studio, unaware at the time that lifetime memberships aren’t allowed in BC.

In less than a year, the yoga studio sold to a new owner who had no provisions in place for honouring the existing lifetime memberships.

“No one was taking responsibility,” says Chelsea, “I thought I was out of luck.” She had paid for a service that no one was willing to provide and was disappointed that her method of relaxation had turned into such a headache. “It was very frustrating and no one was acting very yoga-ish about it,” says Chelsea, “I felt very taken advantage of.”

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Consumer Contracts

Posted on:
06 June 2017
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Mary lives in Kelowna with her son’s in-home caregiver, John*. John was approached by a door-to-door salesperson who was selling a new furnace with a 20-year lease.

John was not properly informed about the lease agreement and therefore did not fully understand his long-term payment plan, which was very expensive. This was when Mary stepped in to try to help John find a way out of the contract. “I was rattling around, trying to find a solution and I contacted Consumer Protection BC,” says Mary.

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Consumer Contracts

Posted on:
25 July 2016
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Have you ever come across a situation where you signed something and immediately after realized that it was a mistake? It’s often our “gut feeling” that tells us to take a different action. In this video, we share the story of Rebecca*. When she found herself in "hot water" with her hot tub contract, she called Consumer Protection BC for help.

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Consumer Contracts

Posted on:
11 July 2016
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Jack and Lisa* had just returned from a Home & Garden Show and were greatly impressed with a paving product showcased by a local provider. Not wasting any time, they called the company into their home to provide an estimate and, after taking some measurements and drawing up a contract, the company requested a $650 deposit for the paving product. Jack and Lisa wrote the cheque and were looking forward to the next step in the process – installation. That step never came.

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Consumer Contracts

Posted on:
13 June 2016
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Charlotte* loves exercising and was excited to enroll in a specialized yoga practice at a local studio. She eventually agreed to purchase a $1000 year-long membership upfront and received a credit card receipt after the transaction but no contract. 

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Consumer Contracts

Posted on:
22 February 2016
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Written by Consumer Protection BC’s enforcement department

Scenario:
You have decided that it’s time to get fit! You sign up at the local gym for a one year membership. The 12 month gym membership includes weight training, cardio machines, as well as unlimited yoga and spin classes. You sign a contract and pay the entire 12 month membership fee of $600. You’re eager to get into shape so you go to yoga and spin classes at least 5 times a week. After a few months, the owner of the gym tells you they will no longer offer those classes but they will still provide weight training and cardio equipment.

What would you do?
(a) Wish they still offered yoga and spin classes but you do nothing, thinking that you still have 9 months left on your contract, and you’ve already paid so there isn’t much you can do.
(b) Ask for a refund for the remaining 9 months of your contract because the gym made substantial changes in the services they provided.
(c) Demand the gym gives your $600 back so you can find another gym that offers yoga and spin classes.

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